Site moved, redirecting in 2 seconds:

http://www.josseybassbusiness.com

28 posts categorized "Featured Blog Series"

March 08, 2011

#2 - What should a new leader do to establish his/her style and make an impact - without rocking the boat?

Our 3rd author series of the year continues! This series is based on the recent news that Time Inc. CEO Jack Griffin left his post at the company after only 6 months in the job. You can read the full article in BusinessWeek here. Yesterday JBbiz author Harry Kraemer weighed in, and today we'll hear from Jeffrey Cohn and Jay Moran, authors of the forthcoming "Why Are We Bad at Picking Good Leaders?" Be sure to read their response below and check out their new book. We'll have more compelling insights to share this week and next and hope you'll chime in, in the blog comments or on Twitter and Facebook.

***

Jeffrey Cohn and Jay Moran:

"Griffin was recruited to Time because of his high accolades, his analytic ability, his change management expertise, and an extremely impressive track record hitting lofty goals in prior jobs.  Sounds great, right?  Unfortunately none of this guarantees success in a new role!  Often a resume contains red-herrings that distract companies from focusing on what truly matters when hiring star talent. At best, a leader's past performance only tells half of the story. Time Inc. could have avoided this hiring blunder by focusing more intently on the leadership attributes that Griffin was lacking --emotional intelligence and empathy to be specific.  The best organizations conduct leadership assessments, before they make key hiring decisions, that focus on 7 key attributes.  [We profile these in detail in our book.]  In Griffin's case, an upfront assessment would have likely revealed his rigidity, his low emotional intelligence, and an inability to adapt to a different culture.  The board of directors would have been able to see, ahead of time, if he had the capacity to understand what makes others tick, and then if he was willing and able to adjust his approach accordingly.   Armed with this knowledge, Time Inc likely wouldn't have hired Griffin.  But even if it had, everyone could have moved forward by providing Griffin with valuable, custom-tailored coaching to increase his chances for success."

Jeffrey Cohn (New York, NY) is an advisor to CEOs and Boards around the world; a public speaker; and an expert in succession planning, assessment and leadership development. Cohn was previously a Research Fellow at the Harvard Business School; the Director of Research at Chief Executive Leadership Institute (Yale); and a Director at the Law & Economics Consulting Group. Cohn has published widely in the areas of leadership development, succession planning and strategic management, including articles in Harvard Business Review, Economist Intelligence Unit, The CEO Refresher, and the Balanced Scorecard Report. He also has been quoted in BusinessWeek, The Economist, the Wall Street Journal, and Workforce Management.

Jay Moran (Barcelona, Spain) is a leading succession planning expert, an executive coach, and a professor of leadership and international business at IES Barcelona and Saint Louis University.  Moran was formally at the CEO Leadership Institute at Yale where he helped launch multiple CEO conferences and workshops for C-Suite executives and Board members on topics including innovation, leadership assessment, talent management, corporate culture and succession planning.

In their book, "Why Are We Bad at Picking Good Leaders?" Cohn and Moran share the same insights and ideas they use to help organizations make better choices. Through dynamic, first-hand accounts, the authors offer the ultimate insider access and reveal how top organizations find and choose the best talent. Includes interviews with: Mike Krzyzewski, "Coach K" (Gold medal coach of US Olympic basketball team and Duke University coach) and Jerry Colangelo, Chairman of USA Basketball; Jeff Bezos (billionaire entrepreneur and CEO of Amazon); George Steinbrenner (the late Yankees legendary owner), Scott Davis, CEO of UPS (world's largest package delivery company); Toby Cosgrove (famous heart surgeon and CEO of world-renowned hospital, Cleveland Clinic); Facundo Bacardi (chairman of Bacardi Ltd.); and more. Available for preorder now.

 

March 07, 2011

What should a new leader do to establish his/her leadership style and make an impact – without rocking the boat?

2011 is already flying by. We can hardly believe this will be our 3rd author series this year! Our March series is based on the recent news that Time Inc. CEO Jack Griffin left his post at the company after only 6 months in the job. You can read the full article in BusinessWeek here. We noticed some Twitter rumblings on the topic and thought this would be the perfect question to open up to our Jossey-Bass business authors. (Our author Bill George even noted via his Twitter account: "6 mos. is a short time to know someone's leadership style.) We have some really compelling insights to share and hope you'll chime in, here in the comments or on Twitter and Facebook.

***

Today's response comes to you from Harry Kraemer, whose Jossey-Bass book "From Values to Action" is available for preorder now:

"Leadership begins within, using self-reflection to identify one’s values: what the leader stands for, what matters most, and how these values will positively impact the organization.  In addition to self-reflection, having balance, true self-confidence, and genuine humility help the leader keep the ego in check, while continuously striving to do the right thing. Only by establishing a values-based foundation can a leader foster alignment and effect meaningful change."

Harry M. Jansen Kraemer, Jr. is a professor of management and strategy at Northwestern University's Kellogg School of Management, where he teaches for the MBA and the Executive MBA programs. He is also an executive partner with Madison Dearborn Partners (MDP), one of the largest private equity firms where he consults with CEOs and other top executives of companies in MDP’s extensive portfolio. Kraemer is the former chairman and chief executive officer of Baxter International Inc., a multi-billion global healthcare company. A recognized expert in values-based leadership, Kraemer has written and spoken widely on the topic. He was voted the Kellogg School Professor of the Year in 2008.

View the book's website: http://www.fromvaluestoaction.com/

Learn more about his book, "From Values to Action: The Four Principles of Values-Based Leadership."

February 15, 2011

#8 - As a Leader, What Should You Be Tracking?

We have one more contribution to this month's blog series and it's a good one! As we're sure you know by this point, this month's author series question is based on an article in the SF Chronicle that sparked our interest. It was about people who are using new technology to track their time. This theme undoubtedly relates to leadership and thus our February series question was born: "As a Leader, What Should You Be Tracking?" Check back every day for a new answer and make sure to share your own with us on Twitter and Facebook.

***

Today's response is from Jossey-Bass author Seth Kahan:

"Knowing what to track is a fundamental leadership skill. Yet it is all too often wasted effort on the wrong indicators. Tracking a plan is a sure way to lose touch with the living, breathing work of strategy execution and business evolution. Yes, you should keep an eye on your plan, but leaders are prone to get caught up watching their rearview mirror all the while  their vehicle speeds ever more quickly through a rapidly shifting landscape. This is a recipe for a wreck.

Tracking is not about logging information. It is not about comparing and adjusting progress according to a mental model. It is about following something alive. Like trailing an animal, the track is the thread between you and a thinking creature. It has its own rhythms, ways in the world, and integrity. Each animal is different. When you are in business, you are tracking value as perceived by your customers. You must learn to pay attention to the cues customers leave for you that show their direction, intents, concerns, hopes, and dreams. The hardest part is simply finding the trail.

Once you have found the tracks, tracking is about maintaining the relationship. That means appreciating and deepening the connection, getting to know your customer - not the generic customer but the individual: your customer. Ultimately, tracking is putting yourself in their shoes. Done well it teaches you who your customer is, what they want, and what they will pay for with their time, money, and attention.  Every leader worth his or her salt tracks their customers so they can become them and build the world they want."

Seth Kahan is the author of Getting Change Right: How Leaders Transform Organizations from the Inside Out (Jossey-Bass, 2010), a Washington Post bestseller and named by the American Express OPEN Forum as a Top 20 of 2010. Seth writes for Fast Company online at www.SethFast.com. He is an executive strategy consultant, working with CEOs and Executive Directors on organizational transformation.

You can reach Seth on the web at: www.VisionaryLeadership.com

Download an excerpt of his book at: www.GettingChangeRight.com

Find him on Twitter at: @sethkahan

Click here for more information or to buy his book

February 10, 2011

#7 - As a Leader, What Should You Be Tracking?

As we're sure you know by this point, this month's author series question is based on an article in the SF Chronicle that sparked our interest. It was about people who are using new technology to track their time. This theme undoubtedly relates to leadership and thus our February series question was born: "As a Leader, What Should You Be Tracking?" Check back every day for a new answer and make sure to share your own with us on Twitter and Facebook.

***

Today's response comes to you from Jossey-Bass author (and regular contributor to our blog!) Steve Denning:

"In traditional management, the role of leaders is often seen as that of a controller who develops a plan and then checks the progress of work against the plan. In today's rapidly workworkplace, however, fixed plans quickly become obsolete and constrain innovation. Moreover as all work is increasingly knowledge work, efforts to control those doing the work become counterproductive.

Today, leadership requires more agility. In effect, the shift in power in the marketplace from seller to buyer means that the customer becomes the effective boss of those doing the work. The leader's role becomes that of an enabler rather than a controller. The leader enables those doing the work (knowledge workers) to deliver more value to customers sooner. The goal is to delight the customers.The two most important things that a leader should be tracking therefore are (a) are customers are being delighted? and (b) what impediments to delighting the customer have been eliminated from the work?"

Stephen Denning is the author of The Leader’s Guide to Radical Management: Reinventing the Workplace for the 21st Century (Jossey-Bass, 2010), which has been selected by 800-CEO-READ as one of the best five books on management in 2010. He is also the author of The Leader’s Guide to Storytelling (Jossey-Bass, 2005) and The Secret Language of Leadership (Jossey-Bass, 2007). A long-time executive at the World Bank, he now advises organizations around the world on leadership, storytelling and reinventing management.

Steve's website is: http://stevedenning.com
Visit his book page: http://www.stevedenning.com/Books/radical-management.aspx
Find him on Twitter: http://twitter.com/stevedenning
Read his Blog: http://stevedenning.typepad.com/steve_denning/
Contact him by Email: steve@stevedenning.com

February 09, 2011

#6 - As a Leader, What Should You Be Tracking?

As we're sure you know by this point, this month's author series question is based on an article in the SF Chronicle that sparked our interest. It was about people who are using new technology to track their time. This theme undoubtedly relates to leadership and thus our February series question was born: "As a Leader, What Should You Be Tracking?" Today we'll hear from author Josh Linkner. Check back every day for a new answer and make sure to share your own with us on Twitter and Facebook.

***

Today's response comes to you from Josh Linkner, author of "Disciplined Dreaming: A Proven System to Drive Breakthrough Creativity" which is due in stores in 2 weeks (available for preorder now):

“In pro sporting events, there is a ‘jumbotron’ that clearly displays a small number of key metrics for everyone to see in plain sight (score, time remaining, innings, etc).  In business, there are thousands of things to track, but the real art is limiting your Key Metrics down to 5-8 items and then sharing them relentlessly.  Install plasmas around the office, email out a “daily dash” to the team, and post them on the walls.  The more visibility and alignment you create as a leader, the better your team can get behind the most important elements of your business and help you win.”

Josh Linkner is founder and CEO of ePrize, a dominant player in the prizes and promotions industry. An accomplished jazz musician, Linkner is also a highly sought-after keynote speaker, and a frequent source-for-comment among top business, technology and marketing media. He has won several business, technology, and design awards including the Ernst & Young Entrepreneur of the Year Award, Crain’s 40 under 40, Automation Alley’s CEO of the Year, and the Detroit Executive of the Year.

ePrize has produced over 5,000 industry-leading interactive promotions (sweepstakes, loyalty programs, prize games, etc.) across 36 countries, for 74 of the Top 100 brands including Coca-Cola, ATT, The Gap, Procter & Gamble, Disney, Dell, Adidas, Citibank and Microsoft. ePrize has won dozens of awards including Red Herring’s Top 100 Technology Firms in North America, Inc. 500 (five years in a row), #1 fastest-growing on PROMO 100, Fast Company’s Fast 50 Reader’s Choice, and 101 best places to work in Michigan.

Visit Josh's website and sign up for his weekly e-newsletter (it's fantastic!): www.joshlinkner.com

Find him on Twitter: @joshlinkner

Find out more about the book and preorder now.

February 08, 2011

#5 - As a Leader, What Should You Be Tracking?

The series continues! This time, we've got a great response from author Carol Kinsey Goman. To recap: this month's author series question is based on an article in the SF Chronicle that sparked our interest. It was about people who are using new technology to track their time. This theme undoubtedly relates to leadership and thus our February series question was born: "As a Leader, What Should You Be Tracking?" Check back every day for a new answer and make sure to share your own with us on Twitter and Facebook.

***

Today's response comes to you from Carol Kinsey Goman, author of the forthcoming and highly ancitipated "The Silent Language of Leaders":

“Leaders should be tracking the number of times they communicate face-to-face, without the aid of technology. F2F is still the preferred and most effective medium for any message that has an emotional component."

Carol Kinsey Goman is is an executive coach, management consultant, and keynote speaker for corporations, associations and government agencies. Clients include over 100 organizations in 24 countries. She is the founder of Kinsey Consulting Services, which focuses on coaching executives in leadership communication and the hidden impact of body language.

Read Carol's most recent contribution to The Washington Post's On Leadership series. 

Chief Learning Officer article featuring Carol: http://clomedia.com/articles/view/4044

Carol's website: http://www.ckg.com/

Twitter: @cgoman

To find out more about the book or preorder now.

February 07, 2011

#4 - As a Leader, What Should You Be Tracking?

It's a new week and we're excited about the line-up of author responses we have to share this week. To recap: this month's author series question is based on an article in the SF Chronicle that sparked our interest. It was about people who are using new technology to track their time. This theme undoubtedly relates to leadership and thus our February series question was born: "As a Leader, What Should You Be Tracking?" Check back every day for a new answer and make sure to share your own with us on Twitter and Facebook.

***

Today's response comes to you from Kevin Eikenberry, co-author of "From Bud to Boss" (in stores February 15 and available for purchase here now):

“As managers there are many things we can/could track.  As leaders the list might be different, and yet very instructive.  Here are a couple ideas:  track progress towards goals, track engagement, track ongoing level of trust in your organization, track your time spent on personal/professional development.  This is just a small start – take these ideas and build your own list!"

Kevin Eikenberry is the Chief Potential Officer of The Kevin Eikenberry Group, a learning consulting company that provides a wide range of services including training delivery and design, facilitation, performance coaching, organizational consulting, and speaking services. He has worked with Fortune 500 companies, smaller firms, universities, and government agencies including the American Red Cross, Aramark, Chevron Phillips Chemical Company, Invesco, John Deere, Nexen, OPTI Canada, Purdue University, Sears Canada, Shell, Southwest Airlines, the U.S. Marine Corp, the U.S. Mint, and Verizon. He is author of several books, creator of a suite of training products, publisher of three e-newsletters, former host of an internet radio show, and a frequent blogger.

Support Kevin and Guy and find out more about the book online here:

Facebook (Kevin’s Fan Page)  http://KevinonFacebook.com

Facebook (Guy’s Fan Page) http://www.facebook.com/recoveringengineer

Facebook (From Bud to Boss Fan Page) http://www.facebook.com/FromBudtoBoss

Twitter (Kevin) @kevineikenberry

Twitter (Guy) @recovengineer

Twitter (book) @BudtoBoss

Blog (Kevin)  http://blog.KevinEikenberry.com

Blog (Guy) http://recoveringengineer.com/

Book website  http://FromBudtoBoss.com

Book Community Blog http://www.budtobosscommunity.com/blog/

February 04, 2011

#3 - As a Leader, What Should You Be Tracking?

As you know, this month's author series question is based on an article in the SF Chronicle that sparked our interest. It was about people who are using new technology to track their time. This theme undoubtedly relates to leadership and thus our February series question was born: "As a Leader, What Should You Be Tracking?" Check back every day for a new answer and make sure to share your own with us on Twitter and Facebook.

***

Today's response comes to you from Ed Lawler, co-author of the forthcoming Management Reset: Organizing for Sustainable Effectiveness (in stores this March):

“It is tempting to say leaders should be tracking everything given the rapidly changing interconnected world we live in!  But we need to be more specific and limited. In our new book, “Management Reset”, we argue for taking a triple bottom line approach:  financial, environmental and social.  We believe that leaders in complex organizations need to regularly assess their performance and that of their organization in these three areas.

Edward E. Lawler III is director of the Center for Effective Organizations at the University of Southern California (USC) and distinguished professor of management and organization in the USC Marshall School of Business. Named one of the country's leading management experts by BusinessWeek magazine, he is the author or coauthor of more than forty books including Treat People Right!, From the Ground Up, Organizing for High Performance, Rewarding Excellence, The Ultimate Advantage, Built to Change, Talent, and Management Reset, all from Jossey-Bass.

Visit his website: www.edlawler.com

Visit the Center for Effective Organizations website: http://ceo.usc.edu/

February 03, 2011

#2 - As a Leader, What Should You Be Tracking?

As you know, this month's author series question is based on an article in the SF Chronicle that sparked our interest. It was about people who are using new technology to track their time. This theme undoubtedly relates to leadership and thus our February series question was born: "As a Leader, What Should You Be Tracking?" Check back every day for a new answer and make sure to share your own with us on Twitter and Facebook.

***

Today's response comes to you from Michael Burchell, whose Jossey-Bass book The Great Workplace is out now:

“Trust. To create a great workplace, leaders can learn from the “Quantified Self” movement – where people use technology to track self logs – by tracking trust.  There are many ways to track certain behaviors that impact the development of trusting relationships with employees, and focusing on certain behaviors can help build your own leadership habits.”

Michael Burchell is coauthor of The Great Workplace: How To Build It, How To Keep It, and Why It Matters, now available wherever books and ebooks are sold. He is a corporate Vice President with the Great Place to Work® Institute and a partner in the Institute's UAE affiliate. A sought after speaker at conferences around the world, he has worked with senior leaders in positioning the workplace as a competitive business advantage.

Visit the website: www.greatworkplaceonline.com

Follow Michael on Twitter: @burchellm

Get updates on the book via Twitter: @thegreatworkP

"Like" the book on Facebook here: www.facebook.com/thegreatworkplacebook

Find out who made this year's Fortune 100 Best Places to Work For List: http://money.cnn.com/magazines/fortune/bestcompanies/2011/index.html

 

February 01, 2011

As a Leader, What Should You Be Tracking?

It's a new month and that means time for a new blog series, featuring more amazing Jossey-Bass authors. A few weeks ago we read an article in the SF Chronicle that sparked our interest. It was about people who are using new technology to track their time. "Quantified Self" is the name of the group, and they track a variety of daily activities such as how much they're eating and when, their sleep patterns, how much time they spend doing the dishes, blood pressure levels, fat consumption, and everything in between. This undoubtedly can relate to leadership and thus our February series question was born: "As a Leader, What Should You Be Tracking?" We've already got a great line-up of answers, starting with Robert Herbold's today. Check back every day for a new answer and make sure to share your own with us on Twitter and Facebook.

***

Today's response comes to you from Robert Herbold, whose Jossey-Bass book What's Holding You Back is out now:

"Since all leaders at all times should be pursuing a specific plan to improve the performance of their organization, they should be regularly measuring the progress against that plan.  Second, since people are clearly the secret to the performance of an organization, and your strong performers are the ones who are going to take you to the next level of excellence, a leader should closely track the progress and assignments of their key performers to make sure they are developing as fast as possible and are making big contributions."

Robert Herbold is the author of What's Holding You Back: 10 Bold Steps that Define Gutsy Leaders. Herbold was executive vice president and chief operating officer of Microsoft Corporation from 1994 until retiring in 2001 and is currently the Managing Director of The Herbold Group, LLC, a consulting business focused on profitability, strategic, and operational issues. Bob will be this week's "Jossey-Bass on Leadership" Guest Blogger and we will be hosting a giveaway of his book this Friday - don't miss out!

View his book page here: http://www.herboldgroup.com/images/whatsholdingback_salesflier.pdf

"Like" his Facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Bob-Herbold/154170271298178